#1674

2019-08-21

Thessalonian Subways and Seneca's History

With Clyde Billington

Our final review of archaeology digest news items from the Summer 2019 issue of ARTIFAX news magazine includes information from Thessalonica, where a subway construction project is far behind schedule due to all of the archaeological treasures which are being found, and a copy of Seneca's Histories has been found for the first time in history. Up til now Seneca's work has only been found quoted in other ancient documents. Other news items include the excavation plans for the huge hippodrome at Laodicea, one of the seven cities of Revelation; a discovery of the oldest shipwreck in the Mediterranean (dating to 1600 BC) carrying a cargo of copper ingots, and plans to make the historic site of Karkemish an open air museum along the Euphrates River.

tags: Laodicea Copper Thessalonica subway Seneca history histories hippodrome Mediterranean shipwreak ingots Karkemish Euphrates

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#1673

2019-08-15

Room of the Last Supper and the Sons of Immer

With Clyde Billington

More discussion of biblical archaeology digest news items from the latest issue of ARTIFAX, our biblical archaeology news magazine: Room of the Last Supper - a laser scan of this medieval construction which commemorates the Upper Room has revealed faded artwork on the walls. Another biblical name has been found on a clay seal impression. The bulla says, "Belonging to Ga'alyahu, son of Immer." The family of Immer is widely attested in the Bible, particularly Jeremiah 20:1. 3D photography has also been used to preserve the excavated remains of a 9,000-year old Neolithic settlement discovered just 3 miles west of Jerusalem at Motza junction. A Watchtower in the Negev desert has been excavated by volunteers from IDF paratroopers.

tags: Seal Bulla Negev Cenacle Last Supper Upper Room Immer Ga'alyahu Motza Watchtower paratroopers

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#1672

2019-08-08

Ziklag, Huqoq, and First Century Fast Food

With Clyde Billington

More news items to discuss from the many news reports in the summer issue of ARTIFAX, the biblical archaeology news magazine. Ziklag, a city associated with King David, has been tentatively identified at a dozen different locations in Israel but now finally we have the correct location, says archaeology Yosef Garfinkel. (Other archaeologists are not so sure.) More mosaic discoveries in this summer's excavations at Huqoq, at the site of a fifth century synagogue overlooking the Sea of Galilee. The mosaics depict the Exodus spring of Elim, and the four beasts of Daniel 7. We also discuss a photo from professsor Carl Rasmussen, showing a first century thermopolia, a fast food establishment excavated at Pompeii. In the first century this is where people got their food because they didn't have kitchens in their high rise apartments.

tags: Huqoq David Garfinkel Mosaic Ziklag Elim Daniel fast food thermopolia

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#1658

2019-04-30

The Tombs of the Kings May Reopen

With Clyde Billington

The Tomb of the Kings was once thought to be the tomb of the ancient kings David and Solomon. Scholars today are pretty sure that's not the case but they still don't know whose tomb it actually was. Top candidates are Queen Helena of Adiabene, a first century convert to Judaism, or King Herod Agrippa I. The government of France owns the tomb and is currently in discussions with the government of Israel about reopening it after all access was curtailed in 2010. The tomb was not widely accessible in 2008 when our Book & The Spade tour visited it. On this program we also discussed several more archaeology news items from the news digests of the latest issue of our magazine ARTIFAX: the possible opening of the ruins of the Nea Church in Jerusalem, a winepress mosaic in the city of Korazin, and a coin of Herod Agrippa.

tags: Herod Nea Church Tombs of the Kings Helena Adiabene Agrippa I Korazin Chorazin

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#1636

2018-11-22

Beit Lehi, Jordan Valley Camps, and Jerusalem Cable Car

With Clyde Billington

More news items from the Autumn issue of ARTIFAX, starting with the excavation at Beit Lehi, "the house of the jawbone." Lots of inscriptions in caves at this site, 60 miles SW of Jerusalem, lots of Hellenistic remains, a Byzantine church and one of the earliest Muslim mosques in Israel. Excavations of stone structures in the Jordan Valley, first identified by Adam Zertal, now continuing under a new archaeological team. Zertal suggested that these structures may have been corrals for early Israelites, who lived in tents, and possible evidence for the Exodus. A cable car plan is being discussed that is generating some controversy. The cable car would cross the Hinnom Valley to Mt. Zion and end at the Dung Gate of the old city.

tags: inscriptions Church Jerusalem Mt. Zion Exodus Israelites Beit Lehi Shephelah Hellenistic period mosque Jordan Valley Cable Car Dung Gate

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