#1554

2017-01-19

The Library at Herculaneum

With Brent Seales

Professor Seales first got our attention a year and a half ago with the news that he had virtually unrolled a carbonized scroll of Leviticus, excavated in 1970 from a burned synagogue on the Dead Sea shore at Engedi. At the time he took up the Leviticus scroll professor Seales had been at somewhat of a dead end on his efforts to read scrolls from the Villa of the Papyri, excavated a century and a half ago from Herculaneum. The ink on the scrolls was indistinguishable from the burned black papyri. But now professor Seales believes he's found the solution to that problem, and it may well be that this ancient library, destroyed by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in A.D. 79, is once again going to be available to interested readers.

tags: Writing Carbonized papyrus Technology Herculaneum Mt. Vesuvius Scrolls

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#1421

2014-03-26

50 Real People of the Bible, Confirmed by Archaeology, part 2

With Larry Mykytiuk

Larry Mykytiuk, Associate professor of Library Science at Purdue University, has developed a protocol for confirming the connection between people of the Bible and individuals named in archaeological inscriptions. At least 50 people have been confirmed as “Real People.” Perhaps even more interesting is his list of “Almost Real People.” This is the second part of that conversation.

tags: Balaam Shebna

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#1420

2014-03-19

50 Real People of the Bible, Confirmed by Archaeology

With Larry Mykytiuk

Larry Mykytiuk, Associate professor of Library Science at Purdue University, has developed a protocol for confirming the connection between people of the Bible and individuals named in archaeological inscriptions. At least 50 people have been confirmed as "Real People." Perhaps even more interesting is his list of "Almost Real People." Here's part one of the interview.

tags: inscriptions

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#1282

2011-06-01

Dead Sea Scrolls Perspectives Updated

With Prof. John J. Collins

Some excerpts from a lecture by professor Collins on major points of agreement amongst Dead Sea Scrolls scholars and how they need to be updated, particularly whether the collection of documents found in the Qumran caves could actually be called a library.

tags: Dead Sea Scrolls John J. Collins Yale Qumran library

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