#1705

2020-04-29

The Dead Sea Scroll Forgeries, part 2

With Christopher Rollston

One of the participants in an academic symposium at the Museum of the Bible, held in conjunction with the release of an investigative report on the museum’s Dead Sea Scroll fragments, was Christopher Rollston. The report, paid for by the museum, found that the fragments were modern forgeries. Rollston, professor of Northwest Semitic languages and literatures at George Washington University, is often called upon to verify the authenticity of ancient inscriptions. In our interview he discusses his desire to see the perpetrator of this fraud brought to justice, and why no one should ever buy antiquities.

tags: Dead Sea Scrolls Museum of the Bible forgeries fragments

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#1704

2020-04-22

The Dead Sea Scroll Forgeries

With Christopher Rollston

One of the participants in an academic symposium at the Museum of the Bible, held in conjunction with the release of an investigative report on the museum’s Dead Sea Scroll fragments, was Christopher Rollston. The report, paid for by the museum, found that the fragments were modern forgeries. Rollston, professor of Northwest Semitic languages and literatures at George Washington University, is often called upon to verify the authenticity of ancient inscriptions. In our interview he discusses the praiseworthy transparency of the museum on this issue.

tags: Dead Sea Scrolls Museum of the Bible forgeries fragments

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#1636

2018-11-22

Beit Lehi, Jordan Valley Camps, and Jerusalem Cable Car

With Clyde Billington

More news items from the Autumn issue of ARTIFAX, starting with the excavation at Beit Lehi, "the house of the jawbone." Lots of inscriptions in caves at this site, 60 miles SW of Jerusalem, lots of Hellenistic remains, a Byzantine church and one of the earliest Muslim mosques in Israel. Excavations of stone structures in the Jordan Valley, first identified by Adam Zertal, now continuing under a new archaeological team. Zertal suggested that these structures may have been corrals for early Israelites, who lived in tents, and possible evidence for the Exodus. A cable car plan is being discussed that is generating some controversy. The cable car would cross the Hinnom Valley to Mt. Zion and end at the Dung Gate of the old city.

tags: inscriptions Church Jerusalem Mt. Zion Exodus Israelites Beit Lehi Shephelah Hellenistic period mosque Jordan Valley Cable Car Dung Gate

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#1563

2017-03-22

Hyrcanus Inscription and The Thinker

With Clyde Billington

More stories from the news digests of the latest issue of ARTIFAX magazine, including inscriptions that name a newly discovered Roman governor of ancient Judea, and that connect to the ruling family of the Hasmonean period. An inscription naming Gargilius Antiquus was found in the harbor of Dor, indicating that he was probably the governor of the Roman province of Judea when the second Jewish revolt broke out. An inscription, "Hyrcanus," was found in the massive Givati Parking Lot excavation just outside the walls of Jerusalem. It is probably one or the other John Hyrcanus, from the Hasmonean lineage of the 1st and 2nd centuries BC. "The Thinker" is the name given to the figure of a man found sitting atop a pot dating to around 1800 BC, the patriarchal period. The man is shown deep in thought. And finally mention of some of the finds from last summer's Gezer excavation

tags: Gezer Gargilius Dor Roman governor Hyrcanus Hasmonean Givati parking lot thinker pendant Bronze Age gate

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#1562

2017-03-14

Dead Sea Scrolls & the Sinai Inscription

With Clyde Billington

Catching up with some of the archaeology stories in the news digests of the latest issue of our ARTIFAX magazine, co-editor Clyde Billington and I discuss some new Dead Sea Scrolls fragments that have been found. That is, they were found in some caves along the western shore of the Dead Sea but not at Qumran, rather further south near Masada, along Wadi Tze’elim. Another discovery in the same cave (known as the Cave of the Skulls) is the Jerusalem Papyrus, which was one of our Top Ten biblical archaeology stories of 2016. This papyrus contains what appears to be the oldest mention of Jerusalem in the Hebrew language, dating to the 7th century B.C. And finally, we discuss the recent proposition put forth by Douglas Petrovich, that the alphabetic Canaanite inscriptions from Wadi el-Hol in Egypt and Serabit el-Khadem in the Sinai were actually written by ancient Hebrews.

tags: Dead Sea Scrolls Alphabetic Cave of the Skulls Jerusalem Papyrus Serabit el-Khadem Sinai Inscriptions Wadi el-Hol Wadi Tze'elim

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