#1562

2017-03-14

Dead Sea Scrolls & the Sinai Inscription

With Clyde Billington

Catching up with some of the archaeology stories in the news digests of the latest issue of our ARTIFAX magazine, co-editor Clyde Billington and I discuss some new Dead Sea Scrolls fragments that have been found. That is, they were found in some caves along the western shore of the Dead Sea but not at Qumran, rather further south near Masada, along Wadi Tze’elim. Another discovery in the same cave (known as the Cave of the Skulls) is the Jerusalem Papyrus, which was one of our Top Ten biblical archaeology stories of 2016. This papyrus contains what appears to be the oldest mention of Jerusalem in the Hebrew language, dating to the 7th century B.C. And finally, we discuss the recent proposition put forth by Douglas Petrovich, that the alphabetic Canaanite inscriptions from Wadi el-Hol in Egypt and Serabit el-Khadem in the Sinai were actually written by ancient Hebrews.

tags: Dead Sea Scrolls Alphabetic Cave of the Skulls Jerusalem Papyrus Serabit el-Khadem Sinai Inscriptions Wadi el-Hol Wadi Tze'elim

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#1553

2017-01-05

Top 10 Biblical Archaeology Stories of 2016

With Clyde Billington

Every year we draw attention to all of the interesting excavations in Biblical Archaeology by highlighting ten of the most exciting discoveries or announcements of the previous year. This year the top discovery on the list goes right to the heart of the Christian faith, the opening up of the traditional tomb of Jesus in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. There are nine more on the list, one all the way at the other end of the Roman Empire.

tags: Church of the Holy Sepulchre

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#1521

2016-04-14

Arad Ostraca and Biblical Literacy

With Walter Kaiser Jr.

This week’s big news in Biblical Archaeology was a new analysis of pottery shards found at the desert fortress of Arad a half century ago, and what they might have to say about literacy and when the Bible was written. Mainline liberal scholars say the evidence shows the Bible could have been written before the Babylonian Exile, not after, as they have believed in recent years. However, evangelicals continue to maintain a much earlier date for the development of widespread literacy and when the Bible was written, in large part based on internal evidence from the Bible itself. That’s the topic of this week’s discussion with Walter Kaiser Jr., President Emeritus and Distinguished Professor of Old Testament and Ethics at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary.

tags: Arad Bible Ostraca Literacy

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#1506

2016-01-01

Top Ten Biblical Archaeology List for 2015

With Todd Bolen

It’s always fun to look back at the end of the year and see how Biblical Archaeology has opened up new perspectives on the biblical world. This year it was not just the discoveries of the year, but how discoveries from previous years were finally realized. Many of our Top 10 items were discovered decades ago, but their significance was only now becoming apparent in 2015. Once again I was joined by Todd Bolen, the editor of Bibleplaces.com, to discuss the news stories of 2015. And our top item on the list highlighted the work of University of Wisconsin alumnus Brent Seales, now a computer science professor at the University of Kentucky. His software developments could open the way for the reading of many more ancient texts, such as the carbonized scroll of Leviticus from the Engedi synagogue that we reported on this year.

tags: Khirbet Qeiyafa Jerusalem Temple Mount Nazareth Synagogue Leviticus Hezekiah Top Ten List

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#1461

2015-01-07

Biblical Archaeology Top Ten of 2014

With Todd Bolen

There was a dearth of sensational discoveries in 2014, and without a bunch of discovery announcements in December it would have been a very slim year of exciting discoveries. But we do have a list, which was picked up by Christianity Today. Tops on the list was the discovery of a new monumental entrance to Herodium, Herod’s fortress/palace in the desert near Bethlehem, an entrance that was apparently never used because Herod decided to close it up and build a mausoleum nearby instead. The second discovery on the list: a half-dozen bullae (clay seal impressions) found at a small site called Khirbet Summeily, on the Judahite/Philistine border. Item #3 is a scarab of Pharaoh Sheshonq, know in the Bible as Shishak.

tags: Herodium Sheshonq bullae

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