#1719

2020-08-19

Technology Opens the Dead Sea Scrolls

With Clyde Billington

Technology is providing new tools to help archaeologists and biblical scholars. In this program, we discuss news reports from the latest issue of ARTIFAX, our biblical archaeology newsmagazine, which highlight new innovations. For example, Dead Sea Scroll fragments that were thought to be without writing were found to have words written on them, when they were scanned with multiple wavelengths of light. In addition we discus some microarchaeology that was used to help pin down the construction date for Wilson's Arch, which supported a walkway from Jerusalem's upper city to the Temple Mount, and is now a feature of the western wall.

tags: Dead Sea Scrolls Technology light wave lengths Wilson's Arch microarchaeology Temple Mount Western Wall

#1719

2020-08-19

Technology Opens the Dead Sea Scrolls

With Clyde Billington

Technology is providing new tools to help archaeologists and biblical scholars. In this program, we discuss news reports from the latest issue of ARTIFAX, our biblical archaeology newsmagazine, which highlight new innovations. For example, Dead Sea Scroll fragments that were thought to be without writing were found to have words written on them, when they were scanned with multiple wavelengths of light. In addition we discus some microarchaeology that was used to help pin down the construction date for Wilson's Arch, which supported a walkway from Jerusalem's upper city to the Temple Mount, and is now a feature of the western wall.

tags: Dead Sea Scrolls Technology light wave lengths Wilson's Arch microarchaeology Temple Mount Western Wall

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#1716

2020-07-22

Lipscomb University's New Archaeology Program

With Steve Ortiz

Following up on last week’s program, another first hand account of the launching of a new #biblicalarchaeology program at Lipscomb University in Nashville. Steve Ortiz and colleague Tom Davis faced the dismantling of the Tandy School of Archaeology at Southwest Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth last March. But then a remarkable thing happened. As we reported last week, Mark Lanier went to work on creating a new place for them at his alma mater, Lipscomb. Steve relates the story from his perspective on the creation of the Lanier School of Archaeology. He also gives an update on his latest field work. After closing out the excavation at Gezer three years ago, he has joined the excavation at Tel Burna.

tags: Mark Lanier Lanier Theological Library Lanier Center for Archaeology Lipscomb University Steve Ortiz Tom Davis Tandy School of Archaeology Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary

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#1712

2020-06-17

The Scroll and the Codex

With Larry Hurtado

Last November, I noticed the passing of Larry Hurtado, Emeritus Professor of New Testament Language, Literature and Theology at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. I recalled a particularly gracious interview that I had with him about ten years ago that I’m finally getting around to replaying now, in his honor. We were talking about news attention given at that time to a mysterious document, a tiny lead book called a codex, which eventually was judged a modern forgery. Larry Hurtado pointed out that it was the early Christians who lead the way in the transition from the scroll to the codex for written material.

tags: Hurtado scroll codex Christians

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#1711

2020-06-10

The Archaeology of Jerusalem's Temple Mount, part 2

With Gabriel Barkay

Israeli archaeology Gabby Barkay calls the Temple Mount the most important archaeological site in Israel. This sensitive holy site, holy to both Jews and Muslims, has never been the site of an archaeological excavation. Nonetheless, an archaeological investigation is underway. It’s called the Temple Mount Sifting Project. In a recent symposium, Barkay, one of Israel’s most distinguished archaeologists, gave the background on how the project came into being and what they are finding.

tags: Temple Mount Archaeology Jerusalem Sifting

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