#1667

2019-07-02

Tel Shiloh 2019

With Scott Stripling

Scott Stripling Scott Stripling This was the third season of excavations at Tel Shiloh, a site about a dozen miles north of Jerusalem that has traditionally been known as the first capital of Israel. It was home to the tabernacle and the Ark of the Covenant for 369 years. Then the ark was captured by the Philistines, returned to Israel and placed in Gibeon, and finally placed in the temple built by Solomon in Jerusalem. Tel Shiloh was excavated by a Danish team about 100 years ago, by Israeli archaeologist Israel Finkelstein in the 1980s, and now by the Associates for Biblical Research. This current excavation is the most rigorous, with modern innovations such as wet sifting, which has allowed the discovery of scarabs and bullae (clay seal impressions) in greater numbers than most other excavations. So once again we talked with dig director Scott Stripling, provost of Bible Seminary in Katy Texas, about the results of the 2019 expedition. We also discovered this video, produced by an Israeli news team about the Shiloh excavation.

tags: Shiloh Tabernacle bullae Ark of the Covenant Scarabs Wet Sifting

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#1657

2019-04-23

Natan-Melech, Servant of the King

With Clyde Billington

One of the most exciting discoveries announced in biblical archaeology so far this year is highlighted on the cover of the latest issue of our quarterly magazine ARTIFAX, a seal impression bearing the name of a man who is referenced in II Kings 23:11: Nathan-Melech. The seal impression, or bulla, was found in the ruins of a burned out administrative building dating to the 5th-6th century BC at a site known as the Givati Car Park excavation. This is a 12-year (so far) excavation just outside the gates of the Old City of Jerusalem, next to the entrance to the City of David, the oldest part of Jerusalem. The biblical reference and the text of the bulla both describe Nathan Melech as "servant of the king." It might not be the same guy, but odds would say it probably is. Along with this bulla, an actual stamp seal was also found in approximately the same place, with the inscription "(belonging) to Ikar son of Matanyahu." Ikar is not known from the Bible. Also on this program, we discuss the 50-year anniversary of the Madeba Plains Project. This is an ongoing excavation involved three major sites in Jordan, handled principly by archaeologists connected with colleges of the Seventh Day Adventist Chuch. The Madeba Plains Project is widely regarded as an exemplary archaeological operation.

tags: Jordan Seal Heshbon Bulla excavation Natan Melech Givati Madeba Plains Jalul

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#1652

2019-03-13

From Dan to Beersheva

With John DeLancey

The traditional description of all of Israel is, “From Dan to Beersheva.” And on our Israel tour with John DeLancey last March, we visited both locations. Tel Dan is located in northern Israel, next to one of the sources of the Jordan River, and has been excavated for decades with some intriguing results. In particular, we visited the high place at Dan, where Jeroboam, king of Israel, erected a golden calf for his people to worship, so they wouldn’t go to the temple in Jerusalem, in the kingdom of Judah. At Tel Beersheva, we gathered at the gate of the city and reviewed the story of Abraham and the well of dispute recorded in Genesis 21.

tags: Altar Tel Dan Abraham golden calf idol Jeroboam I House of David Tel Beersheva well tamarisk tree horns

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#1648

2019-02-12

Yahweh Worshiped at Tel Dan

With Clyde Billington

King Jeroboam I of Israel erected golden calf statues at Dan and at Bethel, saying, "Behold your gods, O Israel, who brought you up out of Egypt." (I Kings 12:28) The idols were meant to keep people from going to Jerusalem to worship in the temple. But who were the people worshiping when they came to Dan and Bethel? Apparently Yahweh and not pagan Canaanite gods, judging by a new analysis of archaeological finds from years of excavations at Tel Dan. Before that discussion with my colleague, professor Clyde Billington, we reviewed another news item from the news digests of the latest issue of ARTIFAX, our quarterly biblical archaeology magazine: the excavations at Tel Keisan, near Acre, the Persian military base from which King Cambyses II launched an attack on Egypt in 525 BC. Also discussed in this program, the discovery of a tiny beka stone, used for weighing the half-shekel temple tax that was assessed on each Jewish male.

tags: Persians Tel Dan Jezreel Valley golden calf idol Jeroboam I Tel Keisan Cambyses II beka temple tax half shilling

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#1457

2014-12-10

Sheshonq's Scarab

With Clyde Billington

More discoveries reported in the latest issue of ARTIFAX magazine reviewed on this program, including the recently announced scarab of Sheshonq, the Egyptian pharaoh who raided through Judah and took all of Solomon’s gold out of the Jerusalem temple. His scarab was found in 2006 at a copper production facility in Jordan. We continue with a discussion of research at another nearby copper facility in Israel at Timna and what has been learned about the men who worked there. We discuss the oldest metal object ever found in the Middle East, an awl at Tel Tsaf, also found several years ago but just recently announced. And finally, the discovery of an ivory game board at an area of the Tel Gezer excavation that’s been dubbed “Solomon’s casino.”

tags: Solomon copper mines games ivory Sheshonq

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