#1589

2017-09-27

Caesarea & the Tsunami

With Clyde Billington

More on the latest in biblical archaeology from the news digests of the autumn issue of ARTIFAX magazine: The IAA is going to investing more money to excavate and reconstruct the city of Caesarea Maritima, the seaport that Herod built on the Mediterranean shore, where visitors can already see impressive remains, including a Roman aquedect, a Roman theater, the remains of Herod’s palace, Crusader walls, etc. We also discuss an archaeologists theories about an ancient tsunami that may have struck the Levantine coast, with ties to a biblically recorded earthquake, plus an explanation of why the story of the biblical judge Othniel contains evidence that supports the early date of the Exodus. All of this discussed with professor Clyde Billington, my co-editor at ARTIFAX magazine.

tags: Temple Menorah Exodus Caesarea tsunami earthquake Augustus Othniel Mitanni

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#1570

2017-05-26

Dead Sea Scroll Fragments & the Hippos Theater

With Clyde Billington

There are a number of unpublished Dead Sea Scroll fragments in the possession of U.S. institutions. We discuss the significance and meaning of this situation, and whether they will be published soon. This story is one of the news digest items from the latest issue of ARTIFAX magazine. The discovery of a large theater, apparently used for cultic worship, at the decapolis city of Hippos/Sussita is another news development reported in ARTIFAX. We discuss these stories and others from the latest issue.

tags: Dead Sea Scrolls Decapolis Roman theater Hippos/Sussita

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#1544

2016-09-20

Paul's Riot in Ephesus, part 2

With James Edwards

Ephesus is mentioned more times in the New Testament than any other city, with the exception of Jerusalem. In this, the second of two programs with James Edwards, professor of Theology at Whitworth University, we review the city as Paul knew it and the archaeological evidence that is being uncovered in Ephesus today. And over the past 100+ years in fact, by an Austrian excavation. The most prominent feature of the ruins of Ephesus is the Roman theater, which was able to seat 25,000 people. Missing is the temple of Artemis, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, which drew pagan worshipers to the city in Paul's day and supplied a source of revenue for the city's silversmiths. What happened when the silversmiths got upset at Paul and filled the theater with angry Ephesians is recounted in Acts 19.

tags: Ephesus Apostle Paul Roman theater Artemis

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#1543

2016-09-13

Paul's Riot in Ephesus

With James Edwards

Ephesus is mentioned more times in the New Testament than any other city, with the exception of Jerusalem. In these two programs with James Edwards, professor of Theology at Whitworth University, we review the city as Paul knew it and the archaeological evidence that is being uncovered in Ephesus today. And over the past 100+ years in fact, by an Austrian excavation. The most prominent feature of the ruins of Ephesus is the Roman theater, which was able to seat 25,000 people. Missing is the temple of Artemis, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, which drew pagan worshipers to the city in Paul's day and supplied a source of revenue for the city's silversmiths. What happened when the silversmiths got upset at Paul and filled the theater with angry Ephesians is recounted in Acts 19.

tags: Ephesus Apostle Paul Roman theater Artemis

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#1445

2014-09-09

Omrit, Polycarp & Battir

With Clyde Billington

Three more news items discussed from the news digest of the latest issue of ARTIFAX magazine: an Assyrian seal discovered at Omrit in northern Israel, completely out of context in a Roman temple; the excavation of the theater where the martyrdom of Polycarp took place; and the preservation of ancient agricultural terraces in the region around Jerusalem.

tags: Seal Assyrian Battir Izmir Polycarp Roman temple Roman theater Smyrna terraces

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