#1565

2017-04-05

Pompeii and Herculaneum

With Joel Pless

A window into the Roman world of the New Testament is afforded through the ruins that have been excavated at Pompeii and Herculaneum. The two cities were destroyed by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in A.D. 79. But is there even more of a biblical connection? An answer that may surprise you from Joel Pless, professor at Wisconsin Lutheran College, in this interview. Yes we do know that the apostle Paul traveled in this area, near the end of his ministry, but there's more than that. Tune in and listen.

tags: Romans Vesuvius

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#1564

2017-03-28

Walls of Jerusalem - Jebusite and Roman

With Clyde Billington

News stories about the walls of Jerusalem, reported in the latest issue of ARTIFAX magazine, include stories about the discovery of two triclinia (banquet rooms), along the western wall of the Temple Mount; the discovery of the location where the Romans breached the “Third Wall” during the first Jewish revolt; and new information about the Middle Bronze Age fortifications built by the Jebusites around the Gihon Spring.

tags: Jerusalem Temple Mount Western Wall Jebusites Romans Triclinium Walls

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#1563

2017-03-22

Hyrcanus Inscription and The Thinker

With Clyde Billington

More stories from the news digests of the latest issue of ARTIFAX magazine, including inscriptions that name a newly discovered Roman governor of ancient Judea, and that connect to the ruling family of the Hasmonean period. An inscription naming Gargilius Antiquus was found in the harbor of Dor, indicating that he was probably the governor of the Roman province of Judea when the second Jewish revolt broke out. An inscription, "Hyrcanus," was found in the massive Givati Parking Lot excavation just outside the walls of Jerusalem. It is probably one or the other John Hyrcanus, from the Hasmonean lineage of the 1st and 2nd centuries BC. "The Thinker" is the name given to the figure of a man found sitting atop a pot dating to around 1800 BC, the patriarchal period. The man is shown deep in thought. And finally mention of some of the finds from last summer's Gezer excavation

tags: Gezer Gargilius Dor Roman governor Hyrcanus Hasmonean Givati parking lot thinker pendant Bronze Age gate

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#1553

2017-01-05

Top 10 Biblical Archaeology Stories of 2016

With Clyde Billington

Every year we draw attention to all of the interesting excavations in Biblical Archaeology by highlighting ten of the most exciting discoveries or announcements of the previous year. This year the top discovery on the list goes right to the heart of the Christian faith, the opening up of the traditional tomb of Jesus in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. There are nine more on the list, one all the way at the other end of the Roman Empire.

tags: Church of the Holy Sepulchre

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#1544

2016-09-20

Paul's Riot in Ephesus, part 2

With James Edwards

Ephesus is mentioned more times in the New Testament than any other city, with the exception of Jerusalem. In this, the second of two programs with James Edwards, professor of Theology at Whitworth University, we review the city as Paul knew it and the archaeological evidence that is being uncovered in Ephesus today. And over the past 100+ years in fact, by an Austrian excavation. The most prominent feature of the ruins of Ephesus is the Roman theater, which was able to seat 25,000 people. Missing is the temple of Artemis, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, which drew pagan worshipers to the city in Paul's day and supplied a source of revenue for the city's silversmiths. What happened when the silversmiths got upset at Paul and filled the theater with angry Ephesians is recounted in Acts 19.

tags: Ephesus Apostle Paul Roman theater Artemis

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