#1672

2019-08-08

Ziklag, Huqoq, and First Century Fast Food

With Clyde Billington

More news items to discuss from the many news reports in the summer issue of ARTIFAX, the biblical archaeology news magazine. Ziklag, a city associated with King David, has been tentatively identified at a dozen different locations in Israel but now finally we have the correct location, says archaeology Yosef Garfinkel. (Other archaeologists are not so sure.) More mosaic discoveries in this summer's excavations at Huqoq, at the site of a fifth century synagogue overlooking the Sea of Galilee. The mosaics depict the Exodus spring of Elim, and the four beasts of Daniel 7. We also discuss a photo from professsor Carl Rasmussen, showing a first century thermopolia, a fast food establishment excavated at Pompeii. In the first century this is where people got their food because they didn't have kitchens in their high rise apartments.

tags: Huqoq David Garfinkel Mosaic Ziklag Elim Daniel fast food thermopolia

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#1666

2019-06-26

Magdala, Home of Mary Magdalene

With Shlomo Ben Asher

One of the most recent archaeological excavation sites that we visit in Israel is Magdala, on the northwestern shore of the Sea of Galilee. The excavation started at Magdala only 10 years ago. Just inches below the surface, archaeologists discovered the remains of a first century synagogue, one of only seven such synagogues discovered in Israel thus far. The odds that Jesus visited this synagogue are probably better than any of the others. In the excavation, archaeologists uncovered a uniquely carved stone platform, which was called a podium, by our Israeli guide Shlomo Ben Asher. It’s true purpose is unknown, and subject to speculation.

tags: Synagogue Magdala Mary Magdalene Shlomo Ben Asher

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#1665

2019-06-18

Visiting Capernaum

With John DeLancey

Capernaum was the city that Jesus called home during his three years of ministry. You can see first century ruins at the archaeological site of Capernaum, as we saw when we visited Capernaum last year during our Book & The Space Archaeological Adventure Tour. The synagogue where John DeLancey recounted some of the Gospel stories of Jesus’ activities in Capernaum was built later, several centuries later, but probably on the same site as the synagogue from Jesus’ time.

tags: Galilee Synagogue Jesus Capernaum

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#1658

2019-04-30

The Tombs of the Kings May Reopen

With Clyde Billington

The Tomb of the Kings was once thought to be the tomb of the ancient kings David and Solomon. Scholars today are pretty sure that's not the case but they still don't know whose tomb it actually was. Top candidates are Queen Helena of Adiabene, a first century convert to Judaism, or King Herod Agrippa I. The government of France owns the tomb and is currently in discussions with the government of Israel about reopening it after all access was curtailed in 2010. The tomb was not widely accessible in 2008 when our Book & The Spade tour visited it. On this program we also discussed several more archaeology news items from the news digests of the latest issue of our magazine ARTIFAX: the possible opening of the ruins of the Nea Church in Jerusalem, a winepress mosaic in the city of Korazin, and a coin of Herod Agrippa.

tags: Herod Nea Church Tombs of the Kings Helena Adiabene Agrippa I Korazin Chorazin

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#1654

2019-03-26

A Week in the Life of Rome, part 2

With James Papandrea

James Papandrea is the author of the 4th book in this series published by InterVarsity Press, historical fiction by biblical scholars that doesn’t scrimp on the story line but adds explanatory details from history and archaeology. Papandrea takes us to the middle of the first century when the Christian church was just getting started in Rome, long before the Apostle Paul made it to Rome. John Mark, the writer of Mark’s Gospel, is one of the central characters. Other personalities known from the Bible are also featured.

tags: Church Rome Christians Peter John Mark

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