#1694

2020-02-04

A Week in the Life of a Greco-Roman Woman, part 2

With Holly Beers

This is the seventh book in this A Week in the Life historical fiction series, published by InterVarsity Press, and the first fiction effort by Holly Beers, a professor of religious studies at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, CA. The fact that it's written by a woman and the main character is a woman makes it a little bit different but professor Beers does a great job of taking us inside the mind of a woman who lived in first century AD Ephesus. One of the best parts of this series are the archaeological and historical sidebars that are sprinkled throughout the books, which helps in our understanding of life in the first century. The worst thing about these books is that they are too short. After getting to know the characters, I would like to learn more about them. In these program she addresses three of the centers of interest in the book: The lecture hall of Tyrannus, the Agora (marketplace), and a worship service in the place of business of Priscilla, Aquila, and Paul.

tags: Ephesus women Paul childbirth Agora

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#1693

2020-01-30

A Week in the Life of a Greco-Roman Woman

With Holly Beers

This is the seventh book in this A Week in the Life historical fiction series, published by InterVarsity Press, and the first fiction effort by Holly Beers, a professor of religious studies at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, CA. The fact that it's written by a woman and the main character is a woman makes it a little bit different but professor Beers does a great job of taking us inside the mind of a woman who lived in first century AD Ephesus. The previous books, I would recommend for adults and teens, but this book is a little more adult-oriented with some graphic descriptions, and I would not recommend for teens without parents reading it first. One of the best parts of this series are the archaeological and historical sidebars that are sprinkled throughout the books, which helps in our understanding of life in the first century. The worst thing about these books is that they are too short. After getting to know the characters, I would like to learn more about them.

tags: Ephesus women Paul childbirth

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#1610

2018-03-21

Roman Camp at Megiddo

With Clyde Billington

Megiddo, one of the most famous sites of biblical archaeology, is becoming even more so with archaeological developments in its neighborhood. While the tell excavation continues (a royal burial was announced recently), a new excavation across the road has been uncovering the remains of second century Roman camp, the largest known in the eastern Mediterranean. Down at the crossroads, about a mile away, an Israeli prison is being demolished. A more modern facility is being built elsewhere, so that the mosaics from Roman period homes can be displayed, one which identifies one of the earliest known Christian worship communities in Israel (discovered in 2005). We also discuss the mosaics found in Byzantine churches in the Galilee, reconnecting Ephesus to the Aegean Sea, a surveillance network in Syria, and an Assyrian document that echoes the story of Abraham from Genesis.

tags: Ephesus Megiddo Roman Legion Abraham prison mosaic church mosaics Cayster River Hagar

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#1544

2016-09-20

Paul's Riot in Ephesus, part 2

With James Edwards

Ephesus is mentioned more times in the New Testament than any other city, with the exception of Jerusalem. In this, the second of two programs with James Edwards, professor of Theology at Whitworth University, we review the city as Paul knew it and the archaeological evidence that is being uncovered in Ephesus today. And over the past 100+ years in fact, by an Austrian excavation. The most prominent feature of the ruins of Ephesus is the Roman theater, which was able to seat 25,000 people. Missing is the temple of Artemis, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, which drew pagan worshipers to the city in Paul's day and supplied a source of revenue for the city's silversmiths. What happened when the silversmiths got upset at Paul and filled the theater with angry Ephesians is recounted in Acts 19.

tags: Ephesus Apostle Paul Roman theater Artemis

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#1543

2016-09-13

Paul's Riot in Ephesus

With James Edwards

Ephesus is mentioned more times in the New Testament than any other city, with the exception of Jerusalem. In these two programs with James Edwards, professor of Theology at Whitworth University, we review the city as Paul knew it and the archaeological evidence that is being uncovered in Ephesus today. And over the past 100+ years in fact, by an Austrian excavation. The most prominent feature of the ruins of Ephesus is the Roman theater, which was able to seat 25,000 people. Missing is the temple of Artemis, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, which drew pagan worshipers to the city in Paul's day and supplied a source of revenue for the city's silversmiths. What happened when the silversmiths got upset at Paul and filled the theater with angry Ephesians is recounted in Acts 19.

tags: Ephesus Apostle Paul Roman theater Artemis

Listen now!