#1638

2018-12-04

Jezreel Valley Regional Project Update

With Matthew Adams

In the flat farm fields between the archaeological tel of Megiddo and the Megiddo prison a mile away lie the remains for the only major Roman Legion base known in the eastern Roman empire. Inside the prison itself, archaeologists have discovered the remains of a second century Christian prayer house, one of the earliest known Christian worship buildings. Matthew Adams, director of the Albright Institute in Jerusalem, fills us in on the latest details of the excavations that are part of the Jezreel Valley Project, and what will be happening when the prison is decommissioned and moved, by order of the Israel Supreme Court.

tags: Megiddo Roman Legion Legio prison Prayer house

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#1611

2018-03-27

What the Ancients Thought of Jesus

With Mark Chavalas

Ancient historians didn't completely ignore Jesus and the nascent Christian movement, there are a few mentions. So, as we prepare for Easter, a time when many different media perspectives on Jesus proliferate, we take a look at what people wrote about him almost 2000 years ago. Our guest on this week's program is Mark Chavalas, professor of history at the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse. His column on what the ancients thought about Jesus is featured in the latest issue of our quarterly magazine, ARTIFAX.

tags: Josephus Jesus Celsus historians

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#1610

2018-03-21

Roman Camp at Megiddo

With Clyde Billington

Megiddo, one of the most famous sites of biblical archaeology, is becoming even more so with archaeological developments in its neighborhood. While the tell excavation continues (a royal burial was announced recently), a new excavation across the road has been uncovering the remains of second century Roman camp, the largest known in the eastern Mediterranean. Down at the crossroads, about a mile away, an Israeli prison is being demolished. A more modern facility is being built elsewhere, so that the mosaics from Roman period homes can be displayed, one which identifies one of the earliest known Christian worship communities in Israel (discovered in 2005). We also discuss the mosaics found in Byzantine churches in the Galilee, reconnecting Ephesus to the Aegean Sea, a surveillance network in Syria, and an Assyrian document that echoes the story of Abraham from Genesis.

tags: Ephesus Megiddo Roman Legion Abraham prison mosaic church mosaics Cayster River Hagar

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#1603

2018-01-17

Remembering Lawrence Stager

With Exavator of Ashkelon

Lawrence Stager was one of the pre-eminent American scholars in Biblical Archaeology. He was the Dorot Professor of the Archaeology of Israel in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University and Director of the Harvard Semitic Museum. He passed away at the end of 2017, just seven days short of his 75th birthday. His most enduring legacy will be the Leon Levy expedition to Ashkelon, which he began in 1985 and directed until it ended in 2016. We did a phone interview in 1992 with professor Stager in which he gave a status report on the Ashkelon excavation, including the discovery of a Middle Bronze Age mud brick gate, the oldest such gate in the world. He also lamented the recent death of one of his most capable protege's, Douglas Esse, who had lost a battle with cancer.

tags: Philistines Ashkelon Harvard Lawrence Stager

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#1593

2017-10-25

The Significance of Biblical Archaeology

With Menahem Mansoor

Menahem Mansoor, the founder of the University of Wisconsin Department of Hebrew and Semitic Studies (now a part of Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies) as well as the Madison Biblical Archaeology Society, discusses the significance of biblical archaeology.

tags: Biblical Archaeology Bible

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