#1685

2019-11-06

Another Adonijah

With Clyde Billington

There area three Adonijah's in the Bible, and now we know about a fourth who also lived in Bible times. A bulla (clay seal impression) has been found in excavations near the Temple Mount in Jerusalem with the inscription, "Belonging to Adoniyahu, royal steward." This Adonijah lived in the 7th century BC, a time different than the other Adonijahs (one of whom was a son of King David). Royal steward was the highest ranking office in the king's administration, so he was important. But we don't know under which 7th century king of Judah he served. This discovery is one of the items from the news digest of the latest issue of ARTIFAX, our biblical archaeology news magazine, discussed with co-editor Clyde Billington. Professor Billington is also president of the Near East Archaeological Society. Other items discussed in this program include two discoveries made by the Mt. Zion excavation in Jerusalem: arrowheads and jewelry from the Babylonian destruction layer, and a Crusader era moat. We also discussed a salty solution that helps preserve the Temple Scroll, one of the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the centennial anniversary of the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago.

tags: Dead Sea Scrolls jewelry Bulla Mt. Zion excavation Adonijah Royal Steward Scythian Arrowhead Temple Scroll Oriental Institute

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#1683

2019-10-24

Biblical Context, part 2

With James Fleming

More from our 1991 interview with James Fleming, director of the Biblical History Center in LaGrange, Georgia. In 1991, he directed a similar facility, the Biblical Resources Study Center in Jerusalem. In this program, some insights of biblical geography, how being in the land of Israel can help us better understand the context of biblical texts.

tags: Dead Sea Scrolls Herodion Bethpage Geography

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#1671

2019-08-01

Machaerus, Melchizedek, and the Philistines

With Clyde Billington

A little further discussion about our ARTIFAX cover story on Machaerus, details of how John the Baptist ended up a prisoner there, and was then beheaded, as reported in Matthew 14 and Mark 6. Also a few more words about the Pilgrimage Road that just opened in Jerusalem, an important pilgrimage spot for both modern Jews and Christians, between the Pool of Siloam and the Temple Mount. Archaeologist Eli Shukron reports the discovery of an altar related to Melchizedeck and Abraham. We are skeptical but looking forward to hearing more. And finally, another major story of the summer, reported in the latest issue of ARTIFAX, DNA evidence that traces the Philistines, or at least some Philistines, to southern Europe.

tags: Jordan Jerusalem Philistines Herod the Great John the Baptist Machaerus Abraham DNA Dead Sea Herod Agrippa Melchizedek

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#1670

2019-07-23

Herod's Fortress at Machaerus

With Jimmy Hardin

The cover story on the latest (summer) issue of ARTIFAX focuses on Machaerus, a fortress palace built by Herod the Great overlooking the Dead Sea from the East. Machaerus is most famous for the imprisonment and beheading of John the Baptist, as recounted in the Gospels and by the historian Josephus. The first excavation of Machaerus was undertaken by Jerry Vardaman, the founding director of the Cobb Institute of Archaeology. We talk with the current interim director, Jimmy Hardin, about some of the results of that excavation that were recently discovered at several locations.

tags: Jordan Herod the Great John the Baptist Machaerus Dead Sea Herod Agrippa

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#1642

2019-12-25

The Mystery of the Magi, part 2

With Dwight Longenecker

The annual Christmas holiday has layers and layers of tradition that have accumulated over 2,000 years but in recent years we have tried to strip away some of the tradition and go back to the story of the birth of Jesus from the Gospels, particularly Matthew and Luke, and for some reason we've focused on the story of the Wise Men a lot in recent years. Dwight Longenecker, the author of a new book called The Mystery of the Magi, digs into this unusual story from Matthew's Gospel and suggests that these Wise Men did not come from Persia, which was quite distant from Jerusalem and Bethlehem, but rather from the Kingdom of Nabatea, which was right across the Dead Sea.

tags: Magi Wise Men Persia Nabatea Petra Aretas

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