#1672

2019-08-08

Ziklag, Huqoq, and First Century Fast Food

With Clyde Billington

More news items to discuss from the many news reports in the summer issue of ARTIFAX, the biblical archaeology news magazine. Ziklag, a city associated with King David, has been tentatively identified at a dozen different locations in Israel but now finally we have the correct location, says archaeology Yosef Garfinkel. (Other archaeologists are not so sure.) More mosaic discoveries in this summer's excavations at Huqoq, at the site of a fifth century synagogue overlooking the Sea of Galilee. The mosaics depict the Exodus spring of Elim, and the four beasts of Daniel 7. We also discuss a photo from professsor Carl Rasmussen, showing a first century thermopolia, a fast food establishment excavated at Pompeii. In the first century this is where people got their food because they didn't have kitchens in their high rise apartments.

tags: Huqoq David Garfinkel Mosaic Ziklag Elim Daniel fast food thermopolia

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#1671

2019-08-01

Machaerus, Melchizedek, and the Philistines

With Clyde Billington

A little further discussion about our ARTIFAX cover story on Machaerus, details of how John the Baptist ended up a prisoner there, and was then beheaded, as reported in Matthew 14 and Mark 6. Also a few more words about the Pilgrimage Road that just opened in Jerusalem, an important pilgrimage spot for both modern Jews and Christians, between the Pool of Siloam and the Temple Mount. Archaeologist Eli Shukron reports the discovery of an altar related to Melchizedeck and Abraham. We are skeptical but looking forward to hearing more. And finally, another major story of the summer, reported in the latest issue of ARTIFAX, DNA evidence that traces the Philistines, or at least some Philistines, to southern Europe.

tags: Jordan Jerusalem Philistines Herod the Great John the Baptist Machaerus Abraham DNA Dead Sea Herod Agrippa Melchizedek

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#1670

2019-07-23

Herod's Fortress at Machaerus

With Jimmy Hardin

The cover story on the latest (summer) issue of ARTIFAX focuses on Machaerus, a fortress palace built by Herod the Great overlooking the Dead Sea from the East. Machaerus is most famous for the imprisonment and beheading of John the Baptist, as recounted in the Gospels and by the historian Josephus. The first excavation of Machaerus was undertaken by Jerry Vardaman, the founding director of the Cobb Institute of Archaeology. We talk with the current interim director, Jimmy Hardin, about some of the results of that excavation that were recently discovered at several locations.

tags: Jordan Herod the Great John the Baptist Machaerus Dead Sea Herod Agrippa

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#1667

2019-07-02

Tel Shiloh 2019

With Scott Stripling

Scott Stripling Scott Stripling This was the third season of excavations at Tel Shiloh, a site about a dozen miles north of Jerusalem that has traditionally been known as the first capital of Israel. It was home to the tabernacle and the Ark of the Covenant for 369 years. Then the ark was captured by the Philistines, returned to Israel and placed in Gibeon, and finally placed in the temple built by Solomon in Jerusalem. Tel Shiloh was excavated by a Danish team about 100 years ago, by Israeli archaeologist Israel Finkelstein in the 1980s, and now by the Associates for Biblical Research. This current excavation is the most rigorous, with modern innovations such as wet sifting, which has allowed the discovery of scarabs and bullae (clay seal impressions) in greater numbers than most other excavations. So once again we talked with dig director Scott Stripling, provost of Bible Seminary in Katy Texas, about the results of the 2019 expedition. We also discovered this video, produced by an Israeli news team about the Shiloh excavation.

tags: Shiloh Tabernacle bullae Ark of the Covenant Scarabs Wet Sifting

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#1657

2019-04-23

Natan-Melech, Servant of the King

With Clyde Billington

One of the most exciting discoveries announced in biblical archaeology so far this year is highlighted on the cover of the latest issue of our quarterly magazine ARTIFAX, a seal impression bearing the name of a man who is referenced in II Kings 23:11: Nathan-Melech. The seal impression, or bulla, was found in the ruins of a burned out administrative building dating to the 5th-6th century BC at a site known as the Givati Car Park excavation. This is a 12-year (so far) excavation just outside the gates of the Old City of Jerusalem, next to the entrance to the City of David, the oldest part of Jerusalem. The biblical reference and the text of the bulla both describe Nathan Melech as "servant of the king." It might not be the same guy, but odds would say it probably is. Along with this bulla, an actual stamp seal was also found in approximately the same place, with the inscription "(belonging) to Ikar son of Matanyahu." Ikar is not known from the Bible. Also on this program, we discuss the 50-year anniversary of the Madeba Plains Project. This is an ongoing excavation involved three major sites in Jordan, handled principly by archaeologists connected with colleges of the Seventh Day Adventist Chuch. The Madeba Plains Project is widely regarded as an exemplary archaeological operation.

tags: Jordan Seal Heshbon Bulla excavation Natan Melech Givati Madeba Plains Jalul

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