#1674

2019-08-21

Thessalonian Subways and Seneca's History

With Clyde Billington

Our final review of archaeology digest news items from the Summer 2019 issue of ARTIFAX news magazine includes information from Thessalonica, where a subway construction project is far behind schedule due to all of the archaeological treasures which are being found, and a copy of Seneca's Histories has been found for the first time in history. Up til now Seneca's work has only been found quoted in other ancient documents. Other news items include the excavation plans for the huge hippodrome at Laodicea, one of the seven cities of Revelation; a discovery of the oldest shipwreck in the Mediterranean (dating to 1600 BC) carrying a cargo of copper ingots, and plans to make the historic site of Karkemish an open air museum along the Euphrates River.

tags: Laodicea Copper Thessalonica subway Seneca history histories hippodrome Mediterranean shipwreak ingots Karkemish Euphrates

Listen now!

mp3 archive


#1673

2019-08-15

Room of the Last Supper and the Sons of Immer

With Clyde Billington

More discussion of biblical archaeology digest news items from the latest issue of ARTIFAX, our biblical archaeology news magazine: Room of the Last Supper - a laser scan of this medieval construction which commemorates the Upper Room has revealed faded artwork on the walls. Another biblical name has been found on a clay seal impression. The bulla says, "Belonging to Ga'alyahu, son of Immer." The family of Immer is widely attested in the Bible, particularly Jeremiah 20:1. 3D photography has also been used to preserve the excavated remains of a 9,000-year old Neolithic settlement discovered just 3 miles west of Jerusalem at Motza junction. A Watchtower in the Negev desert has been excavated by volunteers from IDF paratroopers.

tags: Seal Bulla Negev Cenacle Last Supper Upper Room Immer Ga'alyahu Motza Watchtower paratroopers

Listen now!

mp3 archive


#1672

2019-08-08

Ziklag, Huqoq, and First Century Fast Food

With Clyde Billington

More news items to discuss from the many news reports in the summer issue of ARTIFAX, the biblical archaeology news magazine. Ziklag, a city associated with King David, has been tentatively identified at a dozen different locations in Israel but now finally we have the correct location, says archaeology Yosef Garfinkel. (Other archaeologists are not so sure.) More mosaic discoveries in this summer's excavations at Huqoq, at the site of a fifth century synagogue overlooking the Sea of Galilee. The mosaics depict the Exodus spring of Elim, and the four beasts of Daniel 7. We also discuss a photo from professsor Carl Rasmussen, showing a first century thermopolia, a fast food establishment excavated at Pompeii. In the first century this is where people got their food because they didn't have kitchens in their high rise apartments.

tags: Huqoq David Garfinkel Mosaic Ziklag Elim Daniel fast food thermopolia

Listen now!

mp3 archive


#1671

2019-08-01

Machaerus, Melchizedek, and the Philistines

With Clyde Billington

A little further discussion about our ARTIFAX cover story on Machaerus, details of how John the Baptist ended up a prisoner there, and was then beheaded, as reported in Matthew 14 and Mark 6. Also a few more words about the Pilgrimage Road that just opened in Jerusalem, an important pilgrimage spot for both modern Jews and Christians, between the Pool of Siloam and the Temple Mount. Archaeologist Eli Shukron reports the discovery of an altar related to Melchizedeck and Abraham. We are skeptical but looking forward to hearing more. And finally, another major story of the summer, reported in the latest issue of ARTIFAX, DNA evidence that traces the Philistines, or at least some Philistines, to southern Europe.

tags: Jordan Jerusalem Philistines Herod the Great John the Baptist Machaerus Abraham DNA Dead Sea Herod Agrippa Melchizedek

Listen now!

mp3 archive


#1660

2019-05-14

The 4 Room House, Slavery, and Selah

With Clyde Billington

The Israelite 4 Room House is characteristic of Israelite settlements in the early Iron Age. Archaeologist Avraham Faust has an idea that this iconic home design is connected to women’s purity restrictions which were common in many ancient cultures. This is one of the topics under discussion on this program. We also discuss the discovery of a cuneiform document that describes slavery in the region of Samaria, and we discuss some new archaeology taking place in the capital city of the Edomites: Selah.

tags: women Samaria 4 room house purity slavery Selah Edomites

Listen now!

mp3 archive