#1657

2019-04-23

Natan-Melech, Servant of the King

With Clyde Billington

One of the most exciting discoveries announced in biblical archaeology so far this year is highlighted on the cover of the latest issue of our quarterly magazine ARTIFAX, a seal impression bearing the name of a man who is referenced in II Kings 23:11: Nathan-Melech. The seal impression, or bulla, was found in the ruins of a burned out administrative building dating to the 5th-6th century BC at a site known as the Givati Car Park excavation. This is a 12-year (so far) excavation just outside the gates of the Old City of Jerusalem, next to the entrance to the City of David, the oldest part of Jerusalem. The biblical reference and the text of the bulla both describe Nathan Melech as "servant of the king." It might not be the same guy, but odds would say it probably is. Along with this bulla, an actual stamp seal was also found in approximately the same place, with the inscription "(belonging) to Ikar son of Matanyahu." Ikar is not known from the Bible. Also on this program, we discuss the 50-year anniversary of the Madeba Plains Project. This is an ongoing excavation involved three major sites in Jordan, handled principly by archaeologists connected with colleges of the Seventh Day Adventist Chuch. The Madeba Plains Project is widely regarded as an exemplary archaeological operation.

tags: Jordan Seal Heshbon Bulla excavation Natan Melech Givati Madeba Plains Jalul

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#1656

2019-04-12

Questioning Moses, part 2

With Douglas Petrovich

Mainstream Bible experts and archaeologists don't believe that Moses wrote the first five books of the Bible, despite internal evidence in the Bible (including the words of Jesus himself) that give Moses the credit. Douglas Petrovich, professor of Biblical History and Exegesis at The Bible Seminary in Katy, Texas, has written a book that addresses the issue. The book is: The World’s Oldest Alphabet: Hebrew as the Language of the Proto-Consonantal Script. In it, Petrovich makes the claim that the innovation of alphabetic language took place in Egypt, amongst the Israelites, in the time of Joseph. And that Moses could easily have written the biblical documents attributed to him.

tags: Egypt Alphabet cuneiform hieroglyphics Hebrew Oldest Writing invention Moses

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#1655

2019-04-03

Questioning Moses

With Douglas Petrovich

Mainstream Bible experts and archaeologists don't believe that Moses wrote the first five books of the Bible, despite internal evidence in the Bible (including the words of Jesus himself) that give Moses the credit. Douglas Petrovich, professor of Biblical History and Exegesis at The Bible Seminary in Katy, Texas, has written a book that addresses the issue. The book is: The World’s Oldest Alphabet: Hebrew as the Language of the Proto-Consonantal Script. In it, Petrovich makes the claim that the innovation of alphabetic language took place in Egypt, amongst the Israelites, in the time of Joseph. And that Moses could easily have written the biblical documents attributed to him.

tags: Egypt Alphabet cuneiform hieroglyphics Hebrew Oldest Writing invention Moses

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#1654

2019-03-26

A Week in the Life of Rome, part 2

With James Papandrea

James Papandrea is the author of the 4th book in this series published by InterVarsity Press, historical fiction by biblical scholars that doesn’t scrimp on the story line but adds explanatory details from history and archaeology. Papandrea takes us to the middle of the first century when the Christian church was just getting started in Rome, long before the Apostle Paul made it to Rome. John Mark, the writer of Mark’s Gospel, is one of the central characters. Other personalities known from the Bible are also featured.

tags: Church Rome Christians Peter John Mark

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#1653

2019-03-19

A Week in the Life of Rome

With James Papandrea

James Papandrea is the author of the 4th book in this series published by InterVarsity Press, historical fiction by biblical scholars that doesn’t scrimp on the story line but adds explanatory details from history and archaeology. Papandrea takes us to the middle of the first century when the Christian church was just getting started in Rome, long before the Apostle Paul made it to Rome. John Mark, the writer of Mark’s Gospel, is one of the central characters. Other personalities known from the Bible are also featured.

tags: Church Rome Christians Peter John Mark

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