#1715

2020-07-15

The Lanier Theological Library and Lipscomb University

With Mark Lanier

Even though biblical archaeology fieldwork is mostly nonexistent this summer, there is news in the world of biblical archaeology. The news concerns an archeology program that was killed at one school, and resurrected at another. One of the key characters in this drama is Mark Lanier, a Houston attorney and founder of the Lanier Theological Library. The library has over 100,000 volumes, as well as a number of ancient artifacts. When Mark found out that Southwest Baptist Theological Seminary was pulling the plug on the Tandy School of Archaeology, he started maneuvering to get the two top archaeologists, Steve Ortiz and Tom Davis, hired at his alma mater, Lipscomb University in Nashville. Accreditation is now being sought for the new Lanier Center for Archaeology at Lipscomb.

tags: Mark Lanier Lanier Theological Library Lanier Center for Archaeology Lipscomb University Steve Ortiz Tom Davis Tandy School of Archaeology Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary

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#1706

2020-05-06

COVID 19 Archaeology Impacts And Hadrian's Gate

With Clyde Billington

No excavations at Tel Dan and a number of other archaeological sites in Israel this summer due to the travel restrictions related to the COVID19 coronavirus. But there are still some excavations holding out hope that they may get into the field in 2020. We discuss both situations plus other impacts of COVID19. Also, from the news digest of the latest issue of our biblical archaeology newsmagazine, ARTIFAX, we discuss the reopening of Hadrian’s Gate in Jerusalem, which is almost 2,000 years old, and the discovery of a large Phoenician iron-smithing installation at Akko from the Persian period.

tags: COVID19 Coronavirus Excavations Hadrian's Gate Akko iron Persians

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#1686

2019-11-12

Hippos Sussita Mosaics

With Clyde Billington

Hippos/Sussita, one of the New Testament cities of the decapolis, is the home to at least a half dozen Byzantine churches which have been, or are being, excavated. The latest report from these excavations concerned beautiful mosaics found in one of the churches. The mosaics, among other things, portray Jesus and the feeding of the 5,000, which occurred (somewhere) nearby. We discuss this discovery and others that have been reported in the latest issue of ARTIFAX, our biblical archaeology news magazine, including a beautiful staircase at Hazor which is believed to lead to a plaza and a palace. Then there's the Goliath Wall at Gath, a massive city wall from the time of David and Goliath that is twice as thick as the later walls that were excavated on top of it. And finally, year-round excavations have begun at Assos, a city along the coast of western Turkey that was visited by the Apostle Paul (Acts 20:13). Archaeologists have been working here for 38 years, but are now picking up the pace, to make the site more interesting to visitors.

tags: Gath Mosaics Hippos Sussita Byzantine Churches Hazor Goliath Feeding 5000 Wal Assos staircase

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#1633

2018-11-01

Athens in the Time of Paul

With John McRay

Digging deep into our archives from the early days of TB&TS, we pulled out this description of the city of Athens as Paul would have seen it during his visit, described in Acts 17. Professor John McRay uses archaeology and textual research to help us understand how that ancient city would have appeared in the first century of the Christian era. Professor McRay was a professor at Wheaton College at the time of this presentation, he taught there from 1980 to 2002. We were saddened to learn that professor McRay passed away just last August, he was 86. He is the author of several books, including Paul: His Life and Teaching and Archaeology and the New Testament, and coauthor of Bible Archaeology, all published by Baker.

tags: Paul Athens Unknown God Athena Parthenon Mars Hill Areopagus Dionysius Agora

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#1544

2016-09-20

Paul's Riot in Ephesus, part 2

With James Edwards

Ephesus is mentioned more times in the New Testament than any other city, with the exception of Jerusalem. In this, the second of two programs with James Edwards, professor of Theology at Whitworth University, we review the city as Paul knew it and the archaeological evidence that is being uncovered in Ephesus today. And over the past 100+ years in fact, by an Austrian excavation. The most prominent feature of the ruins of Ephesus is the Roman theater, which was able to seat 25,000 people. Missing is the temple of Artemis, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, which drew pagan worshipers to the city in Paul's day and supplied a source of revenue for the city's silversmiths. What happened when the silversmiths got upset at Paul and filled the theater with angry Ephesians is recounted in Acts 19.

tags: Ephesus Apostle Paul Roman theater Artemis

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