#1668

2019-07-09

Tel Shiloh 2019, part 2

With Scott Stripling

This was the third season of excavations at Tel Shiloh, a site about a dozen miles north of Jerusalem that has traditionally been known as the first capital of Israel. It was home to the tabernacle and the Ark of the Covenant for 369 years. So once again we talked with dig director Scott Stripling, provost of Bible Seminary in Katy Texas, about the results of the 2019 expedition.

tags: Shiloh Tabernacle bullae Ark of the Covenant Scarabs Wet Sifting

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#1667

2019-07-02

Tel Shiloh 2019

With Scott Stripling

Scott Stripling Scott Stripling This was the third season of excavations at Tel Shiloh, a site about a dozen miles north of Jerusalem that has traditionally been known as the first capital of Israel. It was home to the tabernacle and the Ark of the Covenant for 369 years. Then the ark was captured by the Philistines, returned to Israel and placed in Gibeon, and finally placed in the temple built by Solomon in Jerusalem. Tel Shiloh was excavated by a Danish team about 100 years ago, by Israeli archaeologist Israel Finkelstein in the 1980s, and now by the Associates for Biblical Research. This current excavation is the most rigorous, with modern innovations such as wet sifting, which has allowed the discovery of scarabs and bullae (clay seal impressions) in greater numbers than most other excavations. So once again we talked with dig director Scott Stripling, provost of Bible Seminary in Katy Texas, about the results of the 2019 expedition. We also discovered this video, produced by an Israeli news team about the Shiloh excavation.

tags: Shiloh Tabernacle bullae Ark of the Covenant Scarabs Wet Sifting

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#1658

2019-04-30

The Tombs of the Kings May Reopen

With Clyde Billington

The Tomb of the Kings was once thought to be the tomb of the ancient kings David and Solomon. Scholars today are pretty sure that's not the case but they still don't know whose tomb it actually was. Top candidates are Queen Helena of Adiabene, a first century convert to Judaism, or King Herod Agrippa I. The government of France owns the tomb and is currently in discussions with the government of Israel about reopening it after all access was curtailed in 2010. The tomb was not widely accessible in 2008 when our Book & The Spade tour visited it. On this program we also discussed several more archaeology news items from the news digests of the latest issue of our magazine ARTIFAX: the possible opening of the ruins of the Nea Church in Jerusalem, a winepress mosaic in the city of Korazin, and a coin of Herod Agrippa.

tags: Herod Nea Church Tombs of the Kings Helena Adiabene Agrippa I Korazin Chorazin

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#1651

2019-03-05

From Qeiyafa to Lachish

With John DeLancey

The archaeological sites of Khirbet Qeiyafa and Tel Lachish give us biblical connections to the reign of King David and to the conquests of the Assyrians and the Babylonians. We visited both sites during the same day during our 2018 Archaeology Adventure Study Tour and we also have them on our itinerary for our March 2020 tour. Khirbet Qeiyafa overlooks the Elah Valley, where David met Goliath. This unusual city may or may not be mentioned in the Bible, depending on the clues you read. Lachish is mentioned prominently, it was the most important city in Judea outside of Jerusalem.

tags: Khirbet Qeiyafa Elah Valley Goliath King David Azekah Tel Lachish Sennacherib Assyrians

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#1646

2019-01-30

Byzantine Desert Monasteries and the Anchor Church

With Yizhar Hirschfeld

This week's program comes from a 1993 interview that I did at the Israel Museum with Yizhar Hirschfeld, at that time the Field Director of Archaeology for the museum. Among the topics we discussed were the Byzantine monasteries of the Judean desert, the topic of his PhD studies, and the Anchor Church of Mt. Berenice in Tiberias. It too was an outgrowth of the Byzantine era, and was visited by pilgrims for many centuries until its destruction at the end of the Crusader period. Hirschfeld was beginning another major excavation in Tiberias in 2006 when I had some correspondence with him. He died suddenly on November 16, which just happens to be my birthday. He had a distinguished archaeological career that ended much too soon. May his memory be blessed.

tags: Church Byzantine Tiberias Yizhar Hirschfeld Anchor Mt. Berenice Judean Desert monasteries

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