#1668

2019-07-09

Tel Shiloh 2019, part 2

With Scott Stripling

This was the third season of excavations at Tel Shiloh, a site about a dozen miles north of Jerusalem that has traditionally been known as the first capital of Israel. It was home to the tabernacle and the Ark of the Covenant for 369 years. So once again we talked with dig director Scott Stripling, provost of Bible Seminary in Katy Texas, about the results of the 2019 expedition.

tags: Shiloh Tabernacle bullae Ark of the Covenant Scarabs Wet Sifting

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#1667

2019-07-02

Tel Shiloh 2019

With Scott Stripling

Scott Stripling Scott Stripling This was the third season of excavations at Tel Shiloh, a site about a dozen miles north of Jerusalem that has traditionally been known as the first capital of Israel. It was home to the tabernacle and the Ark of the Covenant for 369 years. Then the ark was captured by the Philistines, returned to Israel and placed in Gibeon, and finally placed in the temple built by Solomon in Jerusalem. Tel Shiloh was excavated by a Danish team about 100 years ago, by Israeli archaeologist Israel Finkelstein in the 1980s, and now by the Associates for Biblical Research. This current excavation is the most rigorous, with modern innovations such as wet sifting, which has allowed the discovery of scarabs and bullae (clay seal impressions) in greater numbers than most other excavations. So once again we talked with dig director Scott Stripling, provost of Bible Seminary in Katy Texas, about the results of the 2019 expedition. We also discovered this video, produced by an Israeli news team about the Shiloh excavation.

tags: Shiloh Tabernacle bullae Ark of the Covenant Scarabs Wet Sifting

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#1663

2019-06-01

The Shoulder of Hinnom Excavation, part 2

With Gabriel Barkay

Silver amulet scrolls found in a 1979 excavation at Ketef Hinnom, the Shoulder of Hinnom, in Jerusalem rank in the top 10 archaeological discoveries of Israel, according to a recent article in Haaretz newspaper. Ketef Hinnom overlooks the Hinnom Valley and, on the other side, the walled Old City of Jerusalem. And according to the Times of Israel, it is the site of a new Jerusalem city park. With those two articles fresh in my mind, I dug into The Book & The Spade archives to recover the 1983 interview with archaeologist Gabby Barkay, one of our first guests during the first year that our program was on the air. He told the story of the Ketef Hinnom excavation and the discovery of the silver amulet scrolls.

tags: Gabriel Barkay Silver amulet scrolls Ketef Hinnom Shoulder of Hinnom

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#1661

2019-05-21

Psalm 122: A Psalm of Ascent

With Gordon Govier

Last week I had three opportunities to share some thoughts about Psalm 122 and the archaeology of Jerusalem. One of those events was recorded, so I’m sharing a condensed version of that presentation on this week’s program. The Psalms of Ascent were a part of the pilgrimage experience of Jewish worshippers traveling to the Temple in Jerusalem for the three festivals: Unleavened Bread (Passover), Feast of Weeks (Shavuot), and Feast of Booths (Sukkot) [Deuteronomy 16:16]. In my short presentation I talk about some of the history of Jerusalem, as well as some of the biblical archaeology discoveries that connect Jerusalem with the biblical story.

tags: Jerusalem Pilgrimage Archaeology Psalm 122 Psalms of Ascent feasts

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#1658

2019-04-30

The Tombs of the Kings May Reopen

With Clyde Billington

The Tomb of the Kings was once thought to be the tomb of the ancient kings David and Solomon. Scholars today are pretty sure that's not the case but they still don't know whose tomb it actually was. Top candidates are Queen Helena of Adiabene, a first century convert to Judaism, or King Herod Agrippa I. The government of France owns the tomb and is currently in discussions with the government of Israel about reopening it after all access was curtailed in 2010. The tomb was not widely accessible in 2008 when our Book & The Spade tour visited it. On this program we also discussed several more archaeology news items from the news digests of the latest issue of our magazine ARTIFAX: the possible opening of the ruins of the Nea Church in Jerusalem, a winepress mosaic in the city of Korazin, and a coin of Herod Agrippa.

tags: Herod Nea Church Tombs of the Kings Helena Adiabene Agrippa I Korazin Chorazin

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