#1679

2019-09-24

Jesus and the Synagogue

With Jordan Ryan

The synagogue is a significant part of Jesus' ministry, as recounted in the Gospels. And so little is known about the beginnings of the synagogue, that the Gospel accounts are actually a major resource for such studies. Wheaton College professor Jordan Ryan, author of The Role of the Synagogue in the Aims of Jesus (Fortress Press, 2017), has excavated at Magdala, where one of the most recently discovered first century synagogues was discovered, and has extensively studied the history of the synagogue. In addition to this 3-part interview, Ryan will be speaking in Madison on Saturday, October 19, 2019, International Archaeology Day. His talk is at 7pm at Upper House, 365 East Campus Mall #200, on the University of Wisconsin campus. Presented by the Madison Biblical Archaeology Society and Upper House. More information and registration here. https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-synagogue-in-the-new-testament-a-new-frontier-in-biblical-archeology-tickets-66677503207

tags: Nazareth Synagogue Magdala Jesus

Listen now!


#1643

2019-01-08

Top Ten Biblical Archaeology Stories of 2018

With Gordon Govier

It may take years before we know what was the most important Biblical Archaeology discovery of 2018, but every year I try to identify 10 of the top stories of Biblical Archaeology that were reported on during the year just past, some involving discoveries from many years ago. For instance, our top item, a ring with Pilate's seal, was actually discovered in the 1960s but not identified until 2018. And the statue head of the ancient king, our #2 discovery, was found in 2017 but didn't create news until it was put on display in the Israel Museum in 2018.

tags: Top Ten Seal Pilate ring

Listen now!


#1633

2018-11-01

Athens in the Time of Paul

With John McRay

Digging deep into our archives from the early days of TB&TS, we pulled out this description of the city of Athens as Paul would have seen it during his visit, described in Acts 17. Professor John McRay uses archaeology and textual research to help us understand how that ancient city would have appeared in the first century of the Christian era. Professor McRay was a professor at Wheaton College at the time of this presentation, he taught there from 1980 to 2002. We were saddened to learn that professor McRay passed away just last August, he was 86. He is the author of several books, including Paul: His Life and Teaching and Archaeology and the New Testament, and coauthor of Bible Archaeology, all published by Baker.

tags: Paul Athens Unknown God Athena Parthenon Mars Hill Areopagus Dionysius Agora

Listen now!


#1624

2018-08-08

Who Is This Biblical King?

With Clyde Billington

On the cover of the latest issue of ARTIFAX magazine, the photograph of the head off of a small statue that is believed to depict a king from the 9th century BC. But is it a king of Israel, Aram, Phoenicia, or somewhere else? This faience face was excavated in 2017 at Abel Beth Maacah, a border town down through much of history, as it is today, located between Israel and Lebanon. It is now on display at the Israel Museum. On this program we also discuss more of the news coverage featured in the latest ARTIFAX issue, in particular excavations at the two sites vying to be the biblical Bethsaida, home of three of the Apostles. Excavations continued this summer at et-Tell and El-Araj, the two sites, and first century A.D. remains were found at both locations. Excavations will continue again next year in an attempt to solve this biblical mystery.

tags: Bethsaida et-Tell Abel Beth Maacah Israel el-Araj Statue Aram Phoenicia King faience face

Listen now!


#1603

2018-01-17

Remembering Lawrence Stager

With Exavator of Ashkelon

Lawrence Stager was one of the pre-eminent American scholars in Biblical Archaeology. He was the Dorot Professor of the Archaeology of Israel in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University and Director of the Harvard Semitic Museum. He passed away at the end of 2017, just seven days short of his 75th birthday. His most enduring legacy will be the Leon Levy expedition to Ashkelon, which he began in 1985 and directed until it ended in 2016. We did a phone interview in 1992 with professor Stager in which he gave a status report on the Ashkelon excavation, including the discovery of a Middle Bronze Age mud brick gate, the oldest such gate in the world. He also lamented the recent death of one of his most capable protege's, Douglas Esse, who had lost a battle with cancer.

tags: Philistines Ashkelon Harvard Lawrence Stager

Listen now!